Corned Venison, Because You Can

For as long as I can remember, hunting has been a big part of my family.  The holidays meant venison stew and summer sausage.  The problem is, that is usually the extent of things.  Sure we took advantage of the choice cuts, but that is usually the extent of it.  My family took their deer to the butcher where they had sausage made and took home some steaks.  I, as you already know, make my own sausage and love to play with every part of the deer in different ways.

This corned venison recipe is my fun play on the classic.  I replace and add a few choice spices to help balance and compliment venison.

 

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Ingredients

Brine

2 qt water

1/4 tsp chili flake

1/4 tsp ginger

1/4 tsp rosemary

1/4 tsp caraway

1/4 tsp sage

3 bay leaves

1/8 tsp clove

1/8 tsp ground nutmeg

1C salt

1/2 C sugar

1 tsp pink salt

4 crushed garlic cloves

2.5 # venison roast – I would recommend boneless, but this is a great recipe to use up some of the odd bone-in cuts that we get when we get a deer processed by “professionals.”

 

Procedure

mix all the ingredients except for venison in a pot and bring to a boil.  Stir until sugar and salt are dissolved and then turn off and let cool to room temperature.

pour the brine over the venison roast and place a weight on it to keep it submerged.  A large plastic container or bowl should work for this

Keep the roast in the brine for 4-5 days to allow the brine to be absorbed.

pull the roast from the brine and blot dry

at this point the roast can be placed into a dutch oven or other covered oven safe container.  put enough water in the pot to just cover.  place a piece of parchment or foil over the pot and then the lid.

Place the pot into the oven preheated to 300 degrees for about 3-4 hours until fork tender.   I prefer to sear the roast before putting it into the dutch oven.  I also like to sprinkle some pickling spice in the water if its handy.  This cooking can also be done in a crock pot.

 

Corned meat is a classic flavor that is loved by most.  Why not use this recipe to enjoy your years harvest.  And although I know that it makes for a great roast.  Slice or shred it for an amazing sandwich.  I kinda like it.

corned

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  4 comments for “Corned Venison, Because You Can

  1. Ann Bjorklund
    June 25, 2016 at 12:47 pm

    Have you ever smoked this once it has been brined, rather than putting it into the oven or a crockpot?Ann

    • June 26, 2016 at 12:50 pm

      Yes, and if you smoke it coated in peppercorns and coriander it is a great pastrami. It’s good any way you do it, I’ve found.

      • Ann Bjorklund
        July 4, 2016 at 1:28 pm

        What internal temp do you take it to in the smoker?

        • July 5, 2016 at 6:56 am

          Since venison is so lean, I usually smoke it to an internal temp of about 145. At this point I either steam it to finish or wrap it first with butcher paper and then foil. I then continue to cook until it reaches 195. Then let the pastrami rest for at least 45 minutes.

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